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Light-Of-Day: Tarot & Dream Work - A Practical Guide

Light-Of-Day is a small 45-page book, designed to be a tool for working with the symbols in both Tarot and dream intepretations.

By Gigi Miner

Book - Self Published


Where to Buy · Gigi Miner

Review by Bonnie Cehovet

Don't let the small size (45 pages) of this book fool you. Light-Of-Day is a process - a tool that can be used to open up the rest of your life. In this case, Gigi Miner is applying this tool of expansion to the fields of Dream Work and Tarot reading - both of which work in the realms of conscious and subconscious energies, and both of which address the manner in which we see ourselves, our options, our opportunities and our futures.

Symbolism, and how we choose to work with the symbols in our lives, is at the basis of Gigi's Light-Of-Day process. In essence, we work with one symbol at a time. How we interpret the symbol becomes an internal, rather than an external process. Through the use of journaling and stream of consciousness writing, we discover what the symbols in our lives mean to us. As Gigi points out - the same symbol will mean different things to different people, depending on their individual life experiences. I would take this one step further, and, from personal experience, say that any given symbol may mean something different to the same individual on different days, or under different circumstances.

In dream work, we need to remember that we are the authors/directors of our own dreams. Therefore, we are also authors of the symbols within them - they originate from within ourselves. In using the Light-Of-Day process, we work with one symbol at a time from our dreams, and come to understand it and its place int he overall scheme of the dream. We look at not only our intellectual reaction to the symbol, but also at how we "feel" - how we are reacting physically to the symbol.

Gigi presents a list of questions that are helpful in determining what a given symbol may mean to the dreamer. Included on that list are:

  • Does its shape remind you of something else?
  • Did you see this symbol elsewhere?
  • Was it part of something larger?
  • Where were you when you saw it?

    All of this allows us to go beyond our own boundaries and see what the next step is - see what needs resolution in our lives, and where we need to go from there. Gigi acknowledges that some of the symbols that come up are shadows for us - issues that we have kept hidden, and that we do not want to work with. She calls this process the Dark-Of-Night. While as individuals we can work through these issues, Gigi makes the very sensible observation that at times like this, it may be wise to seek outside help, outside counsel. We alone determine our destinies - but it is not wrong to ask for directions along the way!

    Taking the Light-Of-Day process into the realm of Tarot reading opens up a tool that is already meant to open up our lives. As she points out - different Tarot decks carry different symbolism, so the first thing that we want to do is work with a deck that resonates with us. Gigi makes the suggestion that as we "personalize" the meanings of the individual symbols on our decks, they will have deeper meanings for us, and give deeper meaning to our readings. The combination of the meaning of the card and the meaning of its position within the spread is what determines how each card interacts with the other cards in a reading.

    The same Light-Of-Day process is used with Tarot as with dreamwork. Take one symbol from the card and journal what meanings it has for you. Go back to the card, and see what your overall impression of the card is. How does this correlate with the meaning for the symbol that you are working on? What, if anything, has changed?

    As with dreamwork, the symbols, once broken down, are put back together in the format of the given Tarot card. The interesting thing here - the emphasis on the theory that "there are no rules". As a Tarot reader myself, I applaud this sentiment. The student needs to learn the basics - and then read in the best manner that they are capable of reading. As long as the reader is consistent with what they do, their readings will go well.

    Using the Light-Of-Day process, you are able to go deeply within yourself and discover your hidden talents and abilities - discover who you are as a person, what your strengths and weaknesses are, and truly take control of your future.

    At the end of the Tarot section, Gigi presents a sample exercise. This exercise is an alternative way to learn the leanings of the cards, through making best use of the symbols that they contain. Try this exercise - it may take away existing blocks and move you to places that you never thought you could go with the Tarot.

    Gigi also includes a chapter on a few of the possible Light-Of-Day meanings for each of the cards. From the book:

    Fool - dog - a dog is a companion, a watchful guardian, a friend, a child, responsibility, they bite, they give unconditional love.

    Cups - drinking, thirst, water

    Three of Cups - dancing - party, celebration, enjoying life, music, excess energy

    Queen of Pentacles -rabbit - amorous, timid, quick *

    Compare the associations for the symbol of the rabbit with the normal associations for the Queen of Pentacles. See how it fits into the total picture.

    Something that Gigi emphasizes when working with clients is to ask them to focus on the one symbol that stands out for them, and them working from there - perhaps taking them on a mini Light-Of-Day journey. This reminded me of the processes that two Tarot teachers that I know of use - Mary Greer (Tarot For Yourself) and James Wanless (Voyager Tarot). We can do as much with the Tarot archetypes as we think we can.

    I highly recommend Light-Of-Day for those working with either dream interpretation or the Tarot - or with both. The system is simple, honors yourself, your client and the process, and can be used by anyone. The depth to which you can use this system is defined only by the intent that you put into the study.

    © Bonnie Cehovet

    Bonnie Cehovet is Certified Tarot Grand Master, a professional Tarot reader with over ten years experience, a Reiki Master/Teacher and a writer. Bonnie has served in various capacities with the American Tarot Association, is co-founder of the World Tarot Network, and Vice President (as well as Director of Certification) for the American Board For Tarot Certification. She has had articles appear in the 2004 and 2005 Llewellyn Tarot Reader.



    Where to Buy · Gigi Miner




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