Egyptian Lenormand Reviews

The Egyptian Lenormand merges ancient Egyptian gods and symbols with the Lenormand divinatory system. The 37 cards were channeled by the artist, and are bright and colourful with a strong Egyptian flavour.

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Created by Nefer Khepri
Oracle Deck - 37 Cards - Schiffer Books 2015



Review by Koneta Bailey

Nefer brings her expertise of the Ancient Egyptian Culture and divination together to create a colorful and insightful deck and book set that brings a fresh new look to traditional Lenormand.

Being a fan of Cartomancy in all its forms whether it is Tarot, Oracle Cards, or Lenormand, I’ve awaited the release of Nefer Kephri’s newest masterpiece, The Egyptian Lenormand. The bright colors and images captivate your imagination and get your card-reading juices flowing.

The companion book is 175 pages and includes: Keywords, Playing card association, traditional meanings with descriptive commentary including the author/artists thoughts on that particular card, and Ancient Egyptian Meanings. There is a section on how to read Lenormand cards with spreads and examples – a section which discusses in-depth the process/ritual of Activation of the deck for healing and magical purposes. There is a section covering Health and Healing with Health associations for each card. For example: Card 6 – Clouds: The Clouds card represents the lungs and respiratory health in general. The section on the Power of Magic for Manifestation covers What Magic is and is not; Magical Ethics; Intention, Focus and Directed Thought; and Magical associations for the Cards. An example of this would be the meaning for Flowers: Joy, happiness, gifts, healing. Nefer has also included a table which pairs up the Egyptian deities associated with the cards, as well as a sample of how these subjects can be easily integrated.

This is not your Grandmother’'s Lenormand, it’ is Lenormand with lots of options and the information needed to expand your cartomancy knowledge as well incorporating concepts of healing and magic into your reading experience. I highly recommend this deck to anyone who has an interest in Egypt, Lenormand, beautiful art cards, and card reading in general. Khepri’s easy style of writing is both enjoyable and informative. Kudos!

Koneta Bailey enjoys reading and writing about the Tarot, and is currently working on a Tarot deck and book with her husband, Bob. An avid Tarot and Oracle deck collector, she has been reading Tarot professionally for 6 yrs.



Review by LuminariaStar

First, let me say that some readers of Lenormand Oracle cards would say that since this is not a "traditional" Lenormand deck, that it shouldn't carry the Lenormand name. Since it has all the traditional cards in it, (though in a somewhat altered form) I am perfectly happy to call them Lenormand.

The illustrations are playful and vibrant, drawn in vivid colors with a joyous freedom. I have a strong sense of viewing them as if living in an Egypt not yet ancient, when the pyramids were an ongoing part of everyday gossip. I imagine stone-masons drinking the still beer of the time, while a Sybil reads a petite tableau for them at an adjoining table. Of course this is pure fantasy, not only because these are modern times and I am not in Egypt- ancient OR modern- but also because the Lenormand Oracle cards are far too young for any such scenario. Never the less, the image persists in my imagination. Sun-soaked awnings shade a rough open-air taverna, perfumed with the smells of barley beer, river water, cooking millet and wood smoke. The air is ringing with male laughter, and market-place criers hawking their wares in the distance. Colorful cards are spread on the table, and the reading begins.

As in many modern Lenormand decks, there are two cards for the Lady, and two cards for the Man- but these cards are differentiated as Priestess and Goddess, Pharoah and God. I see these as representing us in our highest manifestations as beings who are in the process of realizing our highest potential, or as seekers searching for truth. I like having these possible expressions of roles we play in our life experiences, because we change- we learn, we grow- sometimes we rise, and sometimes we fall. At times we shine, and other times we show our feet of clay. These cards allow for those ups and downs to show up in our readings.

There are other differences also- we have the Cat as well as the Dog, the Ibis instead of the Stork, the Sacred Cow instead of the Bear, the Obelisk instead of the Tower, and the Djed Pillar instead of the Cross. Never the less, the meanings translate with relative ease, and the changes add flavor to the distinctive personality of the deck. Interestingly, the traditional meanings of the card images fall pretty much in line with their Egyptian equivalents. This could be for the very simple reason that all people everywhere and in every era have shared the same basic concerns, interests and problems.

Beside these relatively minor changes, there is something extra- the Activation Cards. As far as I know, this has never been done before- this is the addition of another level of meaning that is notably and deliberately absent from other Lenormand decks.

Readers of the Lenormand Oracle are often insistent that this is not a "psychic" divination method, that the cards are cut and dried, and very "muggle-like" in their orientation. In my experience, that is somewhat true- the readings tend to have an earthy focus on practical, everyday concerns, and almost never delve into the subtleties that Tarot has become known for in the last couple of decades. There is hardly ever a reading about manifesting your highest potential, or self-realization. Inquiries are much more likely to be about steady employment and relationships, rather than personal transformation or the analysis of karmic burdens...but this deck has a built in option to take it where only Tarot has gone before. (Well, that's not strictly true- Psycards and some other oracle systems go there too- but those are subjects for another time.) This deck is designed to be usable for spellwork, an exciting option that is normally outside the realm of this normally businesslike and blunt card system. The book gives simple and clear instruction about how to use focused intention in combination with the cards to manifest desired changes in your life. There is a brief but pithy section on magical ethics, and two extra Activation Cards for the express purpose of creating changes in your personal reality. In my opinion, this makes this deck a valuable addition to any collection where the reader is seeking to expand their effectiveness with greater breadth and depth.

On a more basic note- the cards are beautiful, colorful and unusual in their design. They are borderless, with strong graphic images. The printing is high quality, on good sturdy cardstock with a glossy finish. The book is nicely produced, with an attractive design motif running throughout. There are full color illustrations of the cards throughout, muted slightly by the beige color of the paper they are printed on, and also because the images are somewhat less saturated, so some of the vividness of the cards is lost. You can still easily see the defining features of each card, so that is really not a problem.

Each card is simply defined, with a clear explanation not only of the meaning, but of how it was selected and how it compares to its equivalent in the Egyptian culture.

The writing is quite good- you can tell the author has done her research on the culture and spiritual practices. In fact, Nefer Khepri has a Master's degree in Anthropology, as well as being an accomplished artist, which adds a certain cachet to the innovations designed into her deck.

The packaging is the signature classic glossy box that Schiffer Publishing is known for, with ribbon hinges and a fitted compartment to hold the cards.

Thank you Nefer, for creating this lovely deck, and thank you Schiffer, for making it available to the general public.

LuminariaStar has been a reader for over 40 years, and has taught Tarot skills for over 30 years.She's an avid collector, and has written numerous reviews. She knows what to look for in a deck or a book.



Review by medusawink

Until now using Lenormand cards has had something of a limited appeal for me... largely because I have not been able to relate to the decks themselves, with their old-fashioned and somewhat romantic illustrations. The Egyptian Lenormand deck however moves well beyond these traditional decks in both theme and purpose. As you may suspect from the title this deck has abandoned all pretence of appearing as a traditional deck, instead opting for total immersion in Ancient Egyptian representations of the standard images. At the same time the Egyptian Lenormand has retained all the standard accepted divinatory meanings, rather than exploring progressive or new views and applications of interpretation. In addition to the accepted use of the cards for divination and fortune telling, these cards have two further purposes: healing, and magic. This is something of a precarious high-wire act for Lenormand cards and Nefer Khepri has pulled it off with real style.

This is a deck containing 41 cards. There is an extra male and female card - in deference to same-sex relationships, or the possibility of involvement with more than one relationship.There is an extra Lenormand card – The Cat (to be used in addition to, or instead of The Dog) and two Activation cards. The Activation cards are to be used in rituals to activate the healing and/or magical properties of these cards.

Many of the cards have been renamed to fit with the Egyptian theme of the deck, however the fundamental meanings of the cards remain true to the Lenormand method. Coffin is now Sarcophagus, Scyth – Sickle, Whip – the Crook and Flail, Fox – Desert Fox, Bear – Sacred Cow, Stork – Ibis, Tower – Obelisk, Man – God & Pharaoh, Woman – Goddess & Priestess, Lily – Water Lily, Cross - Djed Pillar.

The cards measure 70 x 113 mm. They are very high quality card stock, smooth, high-gloss, and very flexible. They fit easily into the hands and shuffle well. The print quality is good with clear, strong colours, no misprints, no blurring or bleeds. The artwork is fairly simple but has a charm all of its own. The colours are strong but not the lurid – with plenty of bright desert shades, lovely blues from sky to deep evening, and strong greens.

The images appear to have been drawn with fine liners, paint pens and paint pencils. They have no borders, they fill the whole card face. The titles are situated near the bottom of the image: the card’s number is in the top left corner, and the cartomancy designation is at the top right corner. All numbers and titles are printed in a plain white . The print on the back features the Eye of Horus beaming out blazing light above a pyramid.

The packaging, as all card sets from Schiffer Publishing are, is of an exceptionally high standard. The cards and guidebook come in a solid cardboard box, with glossy print in shades of purple, and images from the Egyptian Lenormand deck. There is a loop of mauve ribbon to open the box, magnetic clasps to keep the lid shut, and ribbon hinges to hold the lid in place. The cards come sealed in plastic and sit in a well with the guidebook atop them.

The 176 page guidebook written by Nefer Khepri is richly illustrated in full colour, with shadowy Egyptian lotus patterns backgrounding the words. Inevitably there is a Dedication, Acknowledgements, Preface, and a brief Introduction. This is followed by 37 chapters, usually double pages, outlining the Interpretations of the cards. There are Keywords, and extensive explanation of the meaning of the card, and an Ancient Egyptian meaning. This generally explains how this object, place, or concept functioned in the Ancient Egyptian world.

This is followed by a large section on How to Read Lenormand Cards. Like the tarot, there are ways to phrase questions; and popular functional layouts that generally provide the clearest answers. There is additional information about choosing a significator, and how they work in a reading. Three layouts are provided – the five card, seven card, and 10 card (Pyramid Of Isis) spreads; along with sample readings. There is extensive information as to how to read a layout properly – unlike the tarot Lenormand cards are *always* read in pairs, and there is real skill involved in doing this well. Nefer Khepri’s instruction is extremely helpful in clarifying all this information and setting a novice well on their way to using this deck properly and well.

Later chapters in the guidebook are about activating and using the deck for healing and magic. This is not part of the regular uses of Lenormand decks, but Nefer Khepri has been instructed through channelled spirit guides that the deck should have broader functions. If you wish, you may, through a simple but effective ritual, activate your deck for healing and magical uses. There is a lengthy chapter on using the cards for healing, and another on using magic for manifestation.

From a personal perspective I have found these cards to be quite uncanny. They are exceptionally responsive, and the answers they provide are consistent and on point. If you are a Lenormand user then give this deck a try – it is impressive. If you are a tarot reader who is wondering what the deal is with Lenormand cards, then start here. The Egyptian Lenormand is an outstanding divination deck that I highly recommend. It may not be suitable for absolute beginners with no experience in using divination decks, but if you read the tarot, or other fortune-telling cards you will have no problems adapting to this outstanding deck.








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