Stone Circle Oracle Reviews

The Stone Circle Oracle has 45 cards with detailed and colourful illustrations, depicting a mix of animals, spiritualities, reality and fantasy. The deck is inspired by a stone circle in the Allegheny Mountains in Pennsylvania, USA, and is intended for contemplation and meditation.

See card images from the Stone Circle Oracle

Created by Sophia Kelly Shultz
Oracle Deck - 45 Cards - Schiffer Books 2013




Review by Thomas Freese

I am fascinated with stone circles and this wonderful oracle brings much more than pretty, tall stones artfully painted. The Stone Circle provides a graphic source of not only divinatory self-discovery but also depicts a range of mythological characters who each teach lessons of archetypal significance. The colorful cards and box have a greenish theme, but many cards are rich in a range of colors. The back of each card shows the greater portion of the artist/author’s notable and intriguing “Green Man” painting. The oracle box, 6 x 9 x 1 ½ inches, is nicely proportioned.

The Stone Circle cards when stacked are ¾ inch tall, and are postcard length and width, 4 x 5 5/8 inches. With rounded corners and medium-thick glossy stock, the 45 cards do command attention in terms of size and graphic work. The book nearly matches the box dimension; it is approximately 5 5/8” x 6 5/8”, and about ¼” inch thick. It’s nice having a genuine book size to read from rather than a tiny book. Each card is represented across the book, usually in two pages and with a black and white copy of the card image. There is room on each second page for journal entries or notes; providing a nice touch and allowing the reader to formulate their own thoughts and feelings and keep a record of same, handy in the book of interpretations. Approximately 34 of the 45 cards show what could be generalized as mythological creatures with the remaining portion depicting standing stones.

For example, thumbing through the cards or book, here are some card titles: Eagle, Guardians (three standing stones which backdrop a sleeping person), Athena, Spider, Divine Sophia, Mother Stone’s Eye, Thoth, Yemaja (Yoruban water goddess), Morning Light (shows several standing stones)…and more. The standing stones are related to specific stones in the experience of the artist/author, and are found in a modern day stone circle in Pennsylvania. Thus there is ample experiential connection with these images, and of course, life experience and some stories given to help ground the metaphor of each card and thus provide narrative that the reader can better understand interpretations when casting a spread.

I tried a few spreads although so far I found the Stone Oracle for me is best done with a one-card draw related to a given question or issue. The author leaves any thought about spreads or reversals to the reader. Each book entry for every card has a title, keyword/s, some brief phrases to help define the teaching symbol/s and then of course text elaborating on the meanings that could be located. I found my use of the Stone Oracle to connect accurately to my perception of the true nature of the issues; in other words, the cards really worked for me. I’m looking forward to doing online research about more of the mythological creatures and thus the Stone Oracle will provide a springboard into fun study and understanding of figures such as Elegua, Ochun, Hecate, Obatala, and others.

Thomas’s first tarot deck in 1979 was a Christmas gift from his mother. Thomas is an experienced tarot and palm reader. He also reads from objects and photos. In addition he has authored 10 books on metaphysical topics and is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor and Board Certified, Registered Art Therapist.








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