The Good Tarot Reviews

The Good Tarot has 78 cards with luminous, delicate, fairy tale artwork. The deck focuses on the present and positive outcomes, rather than divination or fortune telling, and each card has an affirmation rather than a meaning. It's an intuitive oracle in tarot format, aimed at expressing the highest good of all.

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Created by Jena DellaGrottaglia, Colette Baron-Reid
Tarot Deck - 78 Cards - Lifestyles 2017



Review by medusawink

The Good Tarot is the new tarot from the team of Colette Barron-Reid and Jena DellaGrottaglia who have collaborated on The Enchanted Map Oracle Cards, Wisdom of the Hidden Realms Oracle Cards, and Wisdom of the Oracle Divination Cards. The Good Tarot, so-called for its focus on the good of all, and positive outcomes is not a predictive deck as such, but instead has a foundation of observation of emotional and mental states, and is representative of our collective human experiences. The Good Tarot deals with the present rather than future events, and aims to offer immediate solutions through affirmations, and laws of manifestation and attraction.

The Good Tarot has a strong foundation in traditional tarot, and although the advice given to the Seeker is progressive in nature, it still references traditional divinatory meanings. Rather than deny negativity, the cards acknowledge that a negative experience has taken place, and looks for a positive solution. For example, the 3 of Air (3 of Swords) traditionally a ‘negative’ card gives the following advice: Silver linings, natural departures… "A third party helps me to see the truth of this situation… It's in my best interest to let go and allow for something better to take its place."

This is a 78 card, fully illustrated tarot. It has 22 Major Arcana and 56 Minor Arcana. The Minor Arcana is divided into 4 suits based on the elements; Earth, Air, Fire, and Water. Each suit has 10 number cards, and 4 Court cards – Page, Messenger, Queen, and King.

The Major Arcana follows A E Waite’s ordering, although several cards have been renamed: The Lovers have been retitled Love, Wheel of Fortune is now Fortune's Wheel, Death now called Transformation, Temperance is now Patience, The Devil – Temptation, and Judgement is now Call.

The cards measure 90 x 128 mm which is closer in size to oracle cards than a typical tarot deck – these cards are quite broad. The card stock is superb – light and flexible but not flimsy or prone to bending or creasing. They have a high gloss, smooth finish which makes them easy to handle and shuffle, without clumping or sticking together. The print quality is outstanding – the images are clear and crisp, with no blurring, no misprints, and no colour bleeds.

The artwork features a broad palette of exquisite colour compositions with a preponderance of rich earthy tones, glowing shades of aqua, ethereal shades of sky, and delicate woodland greens. The images are digital compositions – collages featuring stunning central photographs, fine detail, and subtle patterns. The overall effect is both exquisite and full of light.

There is no border to these images, they reach right to the edge of the card. The title of each card is given in a rustic, curling font; and the number is contained in a small sunburst positioned in a different place on each image. The back of the card features a delicately patterned image contained within successive frames. Although this image is symmetrical, the shading is not, making this design non-reversible.

The cards come packaged in a solid cardboard box, with lift-off lid. The cards fit snugly inside, with the guidebook on top of them. The box has a glossy finish, and features images from the deck, and information about it. The box is compact enough to fit into a backpack or large shoulder bag, and sturdy enough to withstand the rigours of travel or heavy handling without sustaining significant damage.

The 119-page guidebook is written by the decks conceptual designer Colette Baron-Reid. She opens the guidebook with a note to the Seeker which details the genesis of the deck, and its purpose. She also outlines her 40 year career working with tarot. The second chapter gives in-depth instruction on using the cards, focusing on how to make the most of the affirmations - which take the place of divinatory meanings. The third chapter outlines the structure of the deck (which is traditional), and gives astrological and numerological correspondences for the Minor Arcana.

There are no descriptions of the images, nor is there any analysis of symbols contained within them, or their meanings. Instead each card is given several keywords, and a short affirmation. The affirmation is intended to be spoken aloud by the Seeker, and to that end it is written in first person and is situated in the immediate present. There are no reversed meanings given for these cards, even the most difficult of them is intended to be faced head-on and dealt with from a position of strength and love.

This deck positively glows with luminous art and good intention. It is both attractive to the eye, and to the soul. Yet it is not feeble and spineless, nor does it seek to avoid unpleasantness - to the contrary, it aims to heal that which undermines us, weakens us, breaks us. For those of you looking for a tarot which focuses on personal issues and positive outcomes, and addresses emotional and spiritual needs The Good Tarot is the deck you are looking for. If you are looking for a tarot with modern imagery which maintains its connection with otherworldly mystery and beauty well as alternative spirituality then look no further than this deck.

While not a great beginners deck owing to its lack of traditional imagery and symbolism, those with some familiarity with the tarot will find The Good Tarot easy to work with. The Good Tarot is a feast for the eyes and the spirit.








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