Tarot of Casanova Reviews

An erotic tarot based on Casanova's experiences and lfe in Venice. Naturally the art in the Tarot of Casanova contains a fair amount of nudity but the cards do relate to tarot archetypes.

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Created by Luca Raimondo
Tarot Deck - 78 Cards - Lo Scarabeo 2000

Review by Solandia

Giacomo Casanova, renowned (or notorious) for his passion for women and their passion for him, lived in Venice in the eighteenth century. The Tarot of Casanova pays homage to his life, environment and experiences, which, of course, had a strong erotic influence.

The LWB assures us that the Tarot of Casanova is 'the result of considerable artistic and esoteric research'. They offer their apologies up front to those who may be offended by the theme, but invite others to approach the deck with an open mind. While the images are sexual and concentrate on scenes of Casanova's amorous adventures, they aren't as confronting as the images of the Garden of Priapo Tarot, and do actually relate to the tarot archetypes. The creator has also paid some attention to incorporating the romance and history of Casanova's surroundings - the canals and corners and buildings of what was at the time the Republic of Venice.

That said, women are the sex objects in this deck; there are plenty of busty woman shown full frontal or from behind, but male nudity is nearly non-existent. We see a male chest about four times - the Three and Four of Chalices and the Eights of Swords and Pentacles - but every other male is fully clothed and often masked as well. Most cards show men and women in various hetero sexual positions, dressed (or undressed) in the ruffled, bewigged, powdered fashions of Casanova's time, but not every card has a wide expanse of female flesh. The Aces are still-life images of Venetian canals and buildings, while all courts but the Queens are solitary and fully dressed men.

The majors are fairly traditional archetypes, with Justice numbered as VIII and Strength as XI. Some like the Hierophant and the cards in series from the Tower to the World, are G-rated while others like the Magician or Justice have a more erotic bent.

The deck's LWB works well with the cards, offering adequate explanation of the Casanova cards in divinatory keyword and short phrase form. If that particular card is a scene directly from Casanova's life, a note is also made after the keywords.

"I - The Magician - Initiative, single knowledge, ability, cunning, willpower, independence of thought. Note: Casanova and the Marquise of Urfé."

"XX - Judgement - Exam, consequences, to lay oneself care, the climax, spiritual or moral awakening. Note: The face shows reluctance and shame, but also awareness and an imminent decision."

"Three of Wands - The completion of seduction, giving pleasure, initiative, decision."

The Tarot of Casanova is a theme deck, an art deck, an erotic deck, and an esoteric deck. It is a definite collector's item, and if the nudity and variety of sexual positions don't distract you, a suitable deck for ordinary readings or those of a more physical nature.

Kate Hill (also known as Solandia) is the founder and editor of Aeclectic Tarot, and has reviewed more than 200 decks over the years.

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